Indian Journal of Urology
EDITORIAL
Year
: 2011  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-

Male infertility clinic - Is it useful?


Nitin S Kekre 
 Department of Urology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Nitin S Kekre
Department of Urology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu
India




How to cite this article:
Kekre NS. Male infertility clinic - Is it useful?.Indian J Urol 2011;27:1-1


How to cite this URL:
Kekre NS. Male infertility clinic - Is it useful?. Indian J Urol [serial online] 2011 [cited 2020 Sep 29 ];27:1-1
Available from: http://www.indianjurol.com/text.asp?2011/27/1/1/78399


Full Text

In 1986, an article was published in the British Journal of Urology by Hargreave et al. [1] - "Is a male infertility clinic of any use ?"The authors evaluated the prognostic factors for male infertility, benefits of clinic attendance, and the effect of multiple treatments. It concluded that while one could identify the major prognostic factors, attending the clinic had no impact on fertility. I remember this article for its honest conclusion. Has anything changed in the last three decades? The development of assisted reproductive techniques and in vitro fertilization have had some impact, but the most important function of the male infertility clinic lies in prognostication and counseling. The negative repercussions of male factor infertility are significant, not just in India, but throughout the world. The psychological suffering is often neglected and poorly dealt with. In addition, although great advances have been made in understanding the genetic basis of male infertility, the translation from the bench to clinical practice has been slow. Dr. Rajiv Kumar from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences has guest edited the symposium in this issue on male infertility. It has very impressive in-depth reviews on the current topics, by the best in the field.

This issue has two thought-provoking articles on kidney transplantation. Reddy et al. have analyzed the impact of donor nephrectomy on the quality of life. They conclude most donors felt good about the donation because they have been able to save a life, and do not attach much importance to the technique of donor nephrectomy. Dr. Pranjal Modi describes the use of dual kidney (cadaveric) transplantation. This is of particular importance in India where the cadaveric donor program is in its infancy and marginal donors can significantly expand the donor pool.

I am happy to inform you that very soon we will be launching a video section of the Indian Journal of Urology (IJU). Dr. Anil Mandhani and his team are currently working on it. I am optimistic that we should be able to launch it very soon.

With best Wishes,

References

1Hargreave TB, McGowan B, Harvey J, McParland M, Elton RA. Is a male infertility clinic of any use? Br J Urol 1986;58:188-93.