Indian Journal of Urology
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2001  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 20--21

The left ventricular mass index in adult polycystic kidney disease patients


NK Ganesh Prasad, R Shiva Kumar, R Prabhakar Rao, V Siva Kumar 
 Departments of Nephrology, Cardiology and Statistics, Sri Satya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences & Sri Satya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Puttaparthi, India

Correspondence Address:
V Siva Kumar
Department of Nephrology, SSSIHMS., Prasanthi Gram. Ananthapur Dt., Andhra Pradesh - 515 134
India




How to cite this article:
Prasad NG, Kumar R S, Rao R P, Kumar V S. The left ventricular mass index in adult polycystic kidney disease patients.Indian J Urol 2001;18:20-21


How to cite this URL:
Prasad NG, Kumar R S, Rao R P, Kumar V S. The left ventricular mass index in adult polycystic kidney disease patients. Indian J Urol [serial online] 2001 [cited 2020 Jul 13 ];18:20-21
Available from: http://www.indianjurol.com/text.asp?2001/18/1/20/37374


Full Text

Adult Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality and one possible mechanism is left ventricular hypertrophy contributing to increased left ventricular mass index (LVMI) leading to premature cardiovascular disease and sudden death.[1],[2,[3] Increased LVMI was observed not only with hypertension but also in normotensive patients of ADPKD, suggesting that in addition to hypertension various other factors make contribution. Increase in hemodynamic load, increased reninangiotensin-aldosterone activity, sympathetic nervous activity and increased cardiac extra cellular matrix probably due to polycystin, were cited in the literature as various mechanisms for increased LVMI in ADPKD.[2],[3],[4],[5] Unlike in essential hypertension, the role of Insulin like Growth Factor-1 and Atrial Natriuritic Peptide for increased LVMI were lacking evidence in ADPKD patients.[3]

We studied 25 subjects of ADPKD with special reference to their LVMI and the results are summarized as follows. There were 17 males and 8 females, age range being 16-60 years. 14 patients had definite history of hypertension; normal serum creatinine (<1.5mg%) was noted in 10 patients. MI was assessed by M-mode echocardiography using American cardiologic society formula.[6] The mean value of LVMI of ADPKD patients was found to be high, when compared with the age matched normal Indian population mean LVMI value[7] The student's "t" test revealed significant difference between the means of ADPKD patients and normal controls (p<0.001) in both sex groups [Table]. Hence it is prudent to include the cardiac evaluation for LVMI in all ADPKD patients because of its importance in the management.

References

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3Martinez-Vea A, Valero FA, Bardaji A et al. Left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensiv e patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: Influence of blood pressure and humoral and neuro-hormonal factors. Aln Nephrol 2000: 20: 193-200.
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