Indian Journal of Urology Users online:391  
IJU
Home Current Issue Ahead of print Editorial Board Archives Symposia Guidelines Subscriptions Login
Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
Export selected to
Endnote
Reference Manager
Procite
Medlars Format
RefWorks Format
BibTex Format
   Table of Contents - Current issue
Coverpage
July-September 2020
Volume 36 | Issue 3
Page Nos. 151-241

Online since Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Accessed 5,133 times.

PDF access policy
Full text access is free in HTML pages; however the journal allows PDF access only to users from INDIA, developing countries and paid subscribers.

EPub access policy
Full text in EPub is free except for the current issue. Access to the latest issue is reserved only for the paid subscribers.
View as eBookView issue as eBook
Access StatisticsIssue statistics
RSS FeedRSS
Hide all abstracts  Show selected abstracts  Export selected to  Add to my list
EDITORIALS  

Webinars on journalology in times of a pandemic p. 151
Rajeev Kumar
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_332_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Changing urological practice during COVID-19 Highly accessed article p. 153
Sudheer Kumar Devana, Kapil Chaudhary, Aditya Prakash Sharma, Shrawan Kumar Singh
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_269_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Round-up p. 159
Apul Goel
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_346_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
REVIEW ARTICLES Top

COVID-19 and its impact on genitourinary malignancies Highly accessed article p. 163
C Danny Darlington, Rohan J Mammen, Kim J Mammen
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_167_20  
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has emerged as an alarming disease since December 2019, claiming the lives of thousands across the world to date. This pandemic has burdened healthcare systems all over the world due to its heavy death toll. Researchers are actively working on effective treatment strategies, the scope of vaccination and the production of more medical equipment to tackle this crisis. However, it is important to note that the management of patients with malignancy also needs to be prioritized during such times. Some urological malignancies need early diagnosis and treatment while the diagnosis and treatment of several others can be safely delayed. Hence, we searched MEDLINE for evidence on the optimal management of urological cancers during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Studies published from December 2019 to April 2020 were included in the review. Guidelines formulated by international and national urological societies were also included. This review aims to summarize the present evidence on effective triage and safe management of urological cancers amid COVID-19 pandemic to ensure efficient usage of healthcare resources during these unprecedented times.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Clinical and therapeutic implications of sex steroid hormone receptor status in urothelial bladder cancer p. 171
H Krishna Moorthy, G G Laxman Prabhu, P Venugopal
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_320_19  
Studies on the clinical profile of urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) have shown significant gender differences, namely, higher occurrence in males (male-to-female ratio of 3.5:1) and an advanced stage of disease at the time of diagnosis with rapid progression of the disease after initial diagnosis seen more commonly in females. The relationship between gender and UBC is complex and probably influenced by biological and epidemiological factors. Potential contributory factors such as sex steroid hormone pathway, gender difference in environmental carcinogen exposure, metabolic enzyme activity, and disparities in the intensity of diagnostic evaluation could probably explain the demographic trends in UBC. This comprehensive review of Medline publications during the period 2009–2019 attempts to identify the possible role of sex hormone receptors in gender variation and sexual dimorphism in the occurrence and progression of UBC. The clinical implications of identifying sex steroid receptors on factors such as disease prognostication and the therapeutic role of anti-androgens in the prevention and progression of UBC are critically reviewed. There is now significant evidence in literature to suggest the possible role of sex steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals in the genesis and progression of UBC. These receptors include androgen receptors, estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, and various other orphan receptors. Excessive or reduced expression of these receptors, as well as alterations in their upstream or downstream pathways, correlate well with the clinical and therapeutic outcomes of UBC.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
ORIGINAL ARTICLES Top

Outcomes of standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in biopsy naive Indian men -single center experience p. 179
Abhishek Laddha, Appu Thomas, Deepak Chandran Nair, Greeshma C Ravindran, Ginil Kumar Pooleri
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_344_19  
Introduction: Prostate cancer is now the second-most common cancer in many parts of India. Despite being the second-largest population in the world, data regarding outcomes of biopsy in Indian men are limited. We report the correlation of biopsy finding with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in Indian men undergoing biopsy for either elevated PSA and/or abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) findings. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data of 853 men who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy in a single institution from January 2014 to October 2019. The biopsy was performed when serum PSA was more than 4.00 ng/mL and/or DRE findings were suspicious for malignancy. Results: Overall cancer detection rate was 38.8%. Patients were classified in five groups based on PSA levels, irrespective of DRE findings (0–3.99 ng/mL, 4.00–9.99 ng/mL, 10.00–19.99 ng/mL, 20.00–39.99 ng/mL, and ≥40 ng/mL). Overall prostate cancer detection rates at corresponding at PSA levels were 3/23 (13%), 62/282 (21.9%), 86/226 (38.05%), 66/126 (52.3%), and 165/196 (84.18%), respectively. 331 (38.8%) patients of the total 853 had suspicious DRE, the cancer detection rate in corresponding PSA groups, based on DRE alone was 3/23 (13.04%), 23/42 (54.76%), 39/56 (69.64%), 43/52 (82.69%), and 157/160 (98.13%), respectively. Conclusion: The overall prostate cancer detection rate at our center was 38.8%, which is much higher as compared to other Indian data. Our study also emphasizes the role of DRE in Indian men presenting with elevated PSA.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Low-risk prostate cancer in India: Is active surveillance a valid treatment option? p. 184
Shanky Singh, Saurabh Patil, Ashwin Sunil Tamhankar, Puneet Ahluwalia, Gagan Gautam
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_37_20  
Introduction and Objective: Carcinoma prostate is considered highly aggressive in Asian countries such as India. This raises an argument whether active surveillance (AS) gives a false sense of security as opposed to upfront radical prostatectomy (RP) in Indian males with low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). We analyzed our prospectively maintained robot-assisted RP (RARP) database to address this question. Materials and Methods: Five hundred and sixty-seven men underwent RARP by a single surgical team from September 2013 to September 2019. Of these, 46 (8.1%) were low risk considering the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. Gleason grade group and stage were compared before and after surgery to ascertain the incidence of upgrading and upstaging. Preoperative clinical and pathological characteristics were analyzed for association with the probability of upstaging and upgrading. Results: The mean age was 60.8 ± 6.8 years. Average prostate-specific antigen level was 6.7 ± 2.0 ng/mL. 40 (86.9%) patients had a T1 stage disease and 6 (13%) patients were clinically in T2a stage. A total of 25 (54.3%) cases were either upstaged or upgraded, 19 (41.3%) showed no change, and the remaining 2 (4.3%) had no malignancy on the final RP specimen. Upstaging occurred in 8 (17.4%) cases: 5 (10.9%) to pT3a and 3 (6.5%) to pT3b. Upgrading occurred in 23 (50%) cases: 19 (41.3%) to Grade 2; 3 (6.5%) to Grade 3; and 1 (2.2%) to Grade 4. Conclusions: There is a 50% likelihood of upstaging or upgrading in Indian males with low-risk PCa eligible for AS. Decision to proceed with AS should be taken carefully.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Localization and restaging of carcinoma prostate by 68Gallium prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography computed tomography in patients with biochemical recurrence p. 191
Nikhil Seniaray, Ritu Verma, Sudhir Khanna, Ethel Belho, Ankur Pruthi, Harsh Mahajan
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_275_19  
Introduction: Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radical radiotherapy (RT) are well established primary curative options for localized prostate cancer. Despite technical improvements, prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-recurrence after RP and RT is a common clinical scenario. We aimed to assess the role of 68Gallium (68Ga) prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography computed tomography (PSMA PET/CT) in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after RP or RT for the detection and localization recurrent and metastatic disease. Materials and Methods: We ambispectively (70 retrospective and 100 prospective) analyzed the data of men with biochemical recurrence post-RP and post-RT who were evaluated by 68Ga PSMA PET/CT at our institute. We aimed to assess the relationship between serum PSA levels and the probability of having a positive scan in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Results: The study included 170 men, all had adenocarcinoma of the prostate, 124/170 had previous RP and 46/170 had prior RT. The median serum PSA in the RP group was 1.8 ng/ml and 5.2 ng/ml in the RT group. In the post-RP cohort, the detection rate of 68Ga PSMA PET/CT was 39.3% for PSA 0.2 to <0.5 ng/ml, 47.3% for PSA 0.5 to <1 ng/ml, 68.4% for PSA 1 to <2 ng/ml and 93.1% for PSA ≥2 ng/ml. In the post-RT group, the detection rate was 88.8% for PSA 2 to <4 ng/ml and 100% for PSA ≥4 ng/ml. Conclusions: 68Ga PSMA PET/CT provides a novel imaging modality for the detection of prostate cancer recurrence and metastases at low posttreatment PSA levels, which may help in directing appropriate salvage treatments.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Management of donor kidneys with double renal arteries with significant luminal discrepancy: A retrospective cohort study p. 200
Pankaj Panwar, Devanshu Bansal, Ruchir Maheshwari, Samit Chaturvedi, Pragnesh Desai, Anant Kumar
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_196_20  
Introduction: Side-to-side pantaloon anastomosis for renal grafts with double renal arteries (RA) with significant luminal discrepancy between graft arteries has not been reported. We hypothesized that the pantaloon technique is feasible and safe in these cases. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of all consecutive, open, live-related renal transplants with double RA with significant luminal discrepancy performed at our center from January 2014 to September 2018 was undertaken. Significant luminal discrepancy was defined as smaller RA constituting 30% ± 5% of total RA diameter on preoperative computed tomography angiogram. Three groups were defined: Group A - pantaloon anastomosis, Group B - end-to-side anastomosis of smaller to main RA, and Group C - separate implantation of each artery. The primary objective was to study feasibility and safety of pantaloon anastomosis measured by recipient serum creatinine levels, Doppler ultrasound, and vascular complications (vascular thrombosis and anastomotic bleed). Secondary objectives included measurement of cold ischemia time, warm ischemia time in recipient (WIR), and nonvascular recipient complications. Results: Fifty-eight recipients had donors with double RA with significant luminal discrepancy. Group A - included 40, Group B – 5, and Group C - 13 patients. Recipient creatinine at day-7, -30, and -90 were similar among the groups. The 30-day perioperative complication rate was also similar. Group A and B had significantly lower WIR and higher cold ischemia time compared to Group C. Conclusion: Pantaloon anastomosis is feasible in renal grafts with double RA with significant luminal discrepancy and offers advantage of lower WIR compared to separate implantation technique.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Supranormal differential renal function in adults with ureteropelvic junction obstruction: Does it really exist? p. 205
MA Elbaset, Osama Ezzat, Mostafa Elgamal, MA Sharaf, AM Elmeniar, Abdalla Abdelhamid, Yasser Osman
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_109_20  
Introduction: Some patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) have supranormal differential renal function (snDRF). We aimed to study the outcomes of pyeloplasty in adult patients with UPJO and either snDRF or normal differential renal function (nDRF) and to identify preoperative factors responsible for the snDRF phenomenon. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively retrieved data for all patients who underwent pyeloplasty and had snDRF (differential renal function [DRF] ≥55%) and nDRF (DRF between 45 and 55%) preoperatively. Preoperative radiological data using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging were correlated with the presence of snDRF phenomenon. In addition, scintigraphic findings pre- and post-operatively were also assessed to evaluate the functional outcomes. Results: Of a total of 856 patients, 31 had snDRF (group 1) and 42 had nDRF (group 2). After a mean of 37 months' follow-up in Group 1, 22 patients developed DRF reduction with non-obstructive pattern. Mean DRF % decreased from 59 ± 2.8 to 48 ± 13 (P < 0.0001). However, in Group 2, five patients had DRF decrease. Four patients developed snDRF phenomenon postoperatively. Increased renal pelvis volume ≥50 mm3 and increased anteroposterior pelvic diameter (APD) ≥37 mm were found to predict snDRF phenomenon. The same findings, in addition to preoperative snDRF, correlated with postoperative DRF decrease. Conclusion: SnDRF function could be expected in patients with increased renal pelvis volume and APD. The absolute value or changes in DRF are not reliable to judge treatment failure.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Sexual dysfunction in women with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: A case-control study p. 212
Amit Agrawal, Susanta Tripathy, Deepak Kumar
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_145_20  
Introduction: Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a chronic debilitating illness characterized by urinary frequency, urgency, and pelvic pain. IC/BPS adversely affects the sexual well-being of the patients. We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to compare sexual dysfunction (FSD) in women with IC/BPS versus controls in an Indian cohort where such data is lacking. Materials and Methods: This case–control study was designed to compare the FSDs in patients with IC/BPS to that of asymptomatic controls. Pelvic Pain and Urgency/Frequency (PUF) Questionnaire scores and FSFI scores were used as tools for this study. Results: Thirty-two patients were recruited in each group. Patients with IC/BPS had a significantly higher PUF score as compared to the control group (7.843 vs. 3.656). These patients also scored worse on the total adjusted FSFI score (18.678 ± 4.531 vs. 28.05 ± 4.318; P < 0.05) and individually in all domains of sexual function. Twenty-nine (90.62%) patients of the IC/BPS group had FSD as compared to 12 (37.5%) of patients in the control group. Pain was the most common presenting complaint and was seen in 65.25% of patients in the IC/BPS group as compared to only 31.25% of patients in the control group. Conclusion: The results of our study show that women with IC/BPS have more pain and sexual dysfunction than controls.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
CASE REPORTS Top

Pulmonary lymphangitis carcinomatosa in a patient with carcinoma of urinary bladder p. 216
Tarun Jindal, M Dhanalakshmi, Pravin Pawar
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_148_20  
Pulmonary lymphangitis carcinomatosa occurs due to dissemination of cancer cells in pulmonary lymphatics. It is only rarely seen with urological malignancies and portends a grave prognosis. Its presence in patients with urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder is uncommon. We present a case of a nested variant of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder associated with pulmonary lymphangitis carcinomatosa. We also discuss the symptoms and radiological features that might aid in timely diagnosis of this entity.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

A rare indication for scrotal exploration p. 219
Ulanbek Zhanbyrbekuly, Yernur Aynayev, Ilyas Kairgaliyev
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_337_19  
A young man presented with a suspected hematocele. On exploration of the scrotum, the pathology was identified as a ruptured proximal end of the adductor longus muscle. Muscle rupture occurred as a result of the abduction of the thigh during rehabilitation exercise. This report describes the anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment of this case.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
UROLOGICAL IMAGES Top

Spontaneous bilateral extraperitoneal ureteroinguinal herniation p. 221
Mukesh Kumar Gupta, Ashish Khanna, Shrawan Kumar Singh
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_138_20  
We describe the clinical and imaging findings of a 53-year-old male who presented with recurrent urinary tract infections with bilateral inguinoscrotal swelling, diagnosed as spontaneous bilateral extraperitoneal ureteroinguinal herniation.
[ABSTRACT]  [HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
UROSCAN Top

Renal and testicular involvement in COVID-19 patients – implication for the urologist Highly accessed article p. 223
Abhisek Pandey
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_172_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Open versus robotic radical cystectomy: Results from the 3-year follow-up of the RAZOR trial p. 225
Santhosh Nagasubramanian
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_94_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Lutetium-177 prostate-specific membrane antigen-617 theranostics: New therapeutic hope in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer? p. 227
Satish Kumar Ranjan
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_193_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-targeted biopsies in the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer p. 229
Fragkoulis Charalampos
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_182_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

CheckMate 214 trial: Immune checkpoint regulators for advanced renal cell carcinoma p. 231
Rahul Jena
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_153_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
LETTERS TO EDITOR Top

COVID-19: Urologist's perspective and urology practices Highly accessed article p. 234
Deepak Kumar Ranjan, Gautam Ram Choudhary
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_126_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Re: Maheshwari PN, Arora AM, Sane MS, Jadhao VG. Safety, feasibility, and quality of holmium laser en bloc resection of nonmuscle invasive bladder tumors: A single-center experience. Indian J Urol 2020;36:106-11 p. 236
Swarnendu Mandal, Suvradeep Mitra, Sumit Agrawal, Manoj K Das, Prasant Nayak
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_198_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Authors Reply Re: Maheshwari PN, Arora AM, Sane MS, Jadhao VG. Safety, feasibility, and quality of holmium laser en bloc resection of nonmuscle invasive bladder tumors: A single-center experience. Indian J Urol 2020;36:106-11 p. 237
Pankaj N Maheshwari, Amandeep M Arora
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_212_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Re: Bansal D, Nayak B, Singh P, Nayyar R, Ramachandran R, Kumar R, et al. Randomized controlled trial to compare outcomes with and without the enhanced recovery after surgery protocol in patients undergoing radical cystectomy. Indian J Urol 2020;36:95-100 p. 239
Ankit Misra, Swarnendu Mandal, Manoj K Das, Prasant Nayak
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_174_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta

Author Reply Re: Bansal D, Nayak B, Singh P, Nayyar R, Ramachandran R, Kumar R, Seth A. Randomized controlled trial to compare outcomes with and without the enhanced recovery after surgery protocol in patients undergoing radical cystectomy. Indian J Urol 2020;36:95-100 p. 240
Devanshu Bansal, Brusabhanu Nayak, Prabhjot Singh, Rishi Nayyar, Rashmi Ramachandran, Rajeev Kumar, Amlesh Seth
DOI:10.4103/iju.IJU_195_20  
[HTML Full text]  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [Sword Plugin for Repository]Beta
  Search 
  The Journal 
  The Association 
  Site Statistics 
  Addresses 
  e-Alerts 
  Online Submission 

Submit Articles

Alerts

Join us

HEALTHWARE INDIA